Exciting Times

Two of our projects, both inaugurated  last year,  promise to improve significantly the lives of the children as well as the whole village  community. We are truly excited by the possibilities, even though they both have a long way to go to reach their potential.

Children receive the books

Children receive the books

The reading Project

It is so easy to bemoan the lack of a reading culture in Uganda, but much more difficult to do something about it. In villages where the over-riding need is to put food in the belly and to survive, where carers are often themselves illiterate or read at a very basic level, where a generation was lost to the ravages of HIV, the thought of sitting down in the evening and enjoying a book is not just way down the list of priorities; it is not even on the agenda.

We now have village children who are eager for learning but until now the books have not been available. When schools struggle to exist, reading books can seem to be a luxury. Even in the classroom, a lesson often consists of the teacher copying the contents of his sole copy onto the blackboard and the students reproducing it into their exercise books.

After school finishes for the day, children have to walk home and then do their tasks; fetching water, working in the garden, cooking, looking after younger siblings. It will be dark before they stop and, without electricity, almost impossible to look at the notes they have taken during the day. There is just time to sleep, wake up, do more household chores and walk to school to recommence the cycle.

In the classroom

In the classroom

Can we change all this for the better? We truly hope so. Supporters have paid for the books needed to get the reading for pleasure programme under way. They will be stored in metal boxes which can be transported between Bubebbere and Bulumbu on a weekly basis, so that children in both schools can benefit.

We have also been able to make a start on the purchase of text books for use in the classrooms. It is no more than a beginning and much more needs to be done before the boys and girls will be able to study properly.

The children are delighted to be able to read

The children are delighted to be able to read

The teachers are excited about the possibilities for the future.  We just have to make it work. There has been a real bonus as far as this is concerned. You will recall that Florence Namitala, a sponsored student since her primary school days, has recently completed a course in early childhood education. She has now returned to the villages where, I am told, she is making a real difference to the reading project.

The signs for the future are good – as long as we can keep the momentum going to produce a future with a more literate population of children!!!!

 

Making the bricks

Making the bricks

Brick-making

The purchase of the machine, with the help of a generous donor, during our visit last year delighted us for a range of reasons:  it provides an ecologically sound approach because there is no need to burn wood during the process; it saves money; and the quality of the bricks is better than those manufactured by traditional methods.

All of these advantages hold true, but there is now the potential to offer much more.

You can see the the bricks are interlocking and so need much less cement

You can see the the bricks are interlocking and so need much less cement

The reduction of some 50% in building costs has fed the ambitions of our Ugandan colleagues. The lack of proper storage facilities for the reading scheme books was a real concern. Costs were checked and it was decided that they could build a small resource centre at the orphanage; somewhere for the children to relax with a book.

All of that is wonderful in itself, but we hope that there will be much more to come. Our colleagues have embarked on a plan to include the village community in the project, with the orphanage centre as a model for what can be done.

Already  young men are being employed to make the bricks. In an area where unemployment is a serious problem, this gives them a reason to stick around and not join the exodus into the already over-crowded city.

We should like to replace this kind of home.

We should like to replace this kind of home.

Many village buildings are mud-built, poor in themselves and at risk during the rainy seasons. There is now a vision to work with people to improve the overall situation. and to try to eliminate such poor living conditions.

If sufficient bricks can be sold, the intention is to use the surplus funds to buy a second machine to expand the production; to the advantage of our colleagues and the village as a whole.

A good start

A good start

So … in addition to the original advantages, it will become an income-generating programme, local young men gain employment and there will be (we hope) an improvement in the quality of homes in the village. If things go to plan, the benefits will go well beyond what we had anticipated.

There is much to do before this can be brought to fruition and only time will tell how far it will progress. But there is now hope where formerly there was very little.

 

Keeping the dream alive

The ultimate intention is to help the schools and their communities become independent of outside help; both successful and self-sufficient. The struggle to raise funds to allow this to happen is a perennial one.

The heart tree

The heart tree

Here is one small and innovative idea that our supporters at Westwood Primary School in Lancashire came up with. For St Valentine’s Day, people  were invited to buy and dedicate a heart for 20p. This was then attached to the “heart tree” in the library.

What a great idea to raise valuable funds. Has anyone else got a bright idea? We need you. Please.

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5 thoughts on “Exciting Times

  1. kathy

    Happy Easter from Canada!

    What a wonderful newsletter. Congratulations to all involved, and much success for you in the future.

    K & T

    ________________________________

    Reply
  2. zungulia

    Thanks Keith for sharing the bulletin. It keeps us informed on the progress of your efforts. Welcome back from your trip. Let me hope it was fun and full of learning opportunities. Greetings to Jeanette. Love.  Betty

    Sent from my Samsung device

    Reply
  3. E. Geofrey

    We have built a school to support disadvantage children attain quality education,we raise money by requesting guardian and parents who earn income and live near the school to enroll their children and pay fees, 20 percent of the money raised support the needy children.but we have received request beyond our capacity. we have decided to pattern with a music and a drama organization, NGO .This group teaches music and drama but children don’t study other subject and these children are needy ,so we enrolled the childrens in our school.The children perform music and drama to raise their up keep but its not adequat.

    We request to link with friends who can help so that these children can travel to perform outside uganda to raise more support.their performance is very excellent.focusing on peace,health,environment and love
    Through this initiative we could raise funds to support more children and buy buy books
    Cheers

    Reply

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